Wealthfront has ‘best shot’ to remain leading digital disruptor: Forrester

Friday, September 19th, 2014 at 10:07 am
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Wealthfront has ‘best shot’ to remain leading digital disruptor: Forrester:

It’s hard to solve the problem of human emotion in investing as an online-only service.”

Employee Engagement – There Has to Be a Better Way Doug Shaw,…

Friday, November 22nd, 2013 at 8:24 am
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Employee Engagement – There Has to Be a Better Way

Doug Shaw, stopdoingdumbthingstocustomers.com

Employ­ee Engage­ment – a mighty buzz phrase in the HR lex­i­con. But hold on a minute…

Haven’t heard of it

I saw some real­ly inter­est­ing research data at the CIPD con­fer­ence ear­li­er this month, …

Surveylab also asked people to respond to the statement ‘I feel valued for what I do’. Whilst feeling valued is also subjective, I nevertheless think this is a much more interesting, powerful and accessible thing to ponder. It implies belonging, whereas the term employee engagement can feel divisive, us and them, to some people. In the survey results, 49% agreed or strongly agreed with the statement, and of those people, 90% were overall, satisfied with their employer, 88% enjoyed coming to work, and 93% tried to contribute more than expected of them. By comparison, the figures for those who did not feel valued are 11%, 14% and 72% respectively.

Writing Bytes

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013 at 11:36 am
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Writing Bytes:

RAINBOW ROWELL: There’s nothing worse for plots than cellphones.

Once your characters have one, there’s no reason for them to get lost or stranded. Or miss each other at the top of the Empire State Building. If you want anything like that to happen, you either have to explain upfront what happened to the phones or you have to make at least one character some sort of manic pixie Luddite who doesn’t carry one.

When I started my novel “Fangirl” I was determined that the characters would use technology authentically. They’d text and check e-mail and Google things. I wanted to prove to myself that I could write a romantic and human story about people who constantly have laptops in their laps and cellphones in their hands. Plus, I’m always defending the present to teenagers who read “Eleanor & Park,” my novel set in the ’80s, and think things were so much more romantic back then. Mix tapes. Phone calls. Handwritten love notes.

“ ‘Eleanor & Park’ could never happen now,” they say. “ ‘Eleanor & Park’ is happening now,” I argue. “Twenty years from now, you’ll look back on the first time you fell in love, and nothing will seem more romantic than text messages. Or Snapchat. Or whatever it is you’re doing right now behind your parents’ backs.”

http://www.financial-planning.com/news/generations-x-and-y-prefer-old-fashioned-service-survey-2686393-1.html

Friday, August 30th, 2013 at 1:18 pm
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http://www.financial-planning.com/news/generations-x-and-y-prefer-old-fashioned-service-survey-2686393-1.html:

That said, the study concludes there’s still plenty of room for banks to experiment with technological bells and whistles—just not to the exclusion of individual attention. What these generations want, as one consumer said, is “all the sophistication of the big banks and their cool systems, with all the warmth and familiarity of the local credit union.” – See more at: http://www.financial-planning.com/news/generations-x-and-y-prefer-old-fashioned-service-survey-2686393-1.html#sthash.vhRKTiGG.dpuf

James Surowiecki: Why Do So Many Jobs Pay So Little?

Friday, August 30th, 2013 at 10:12 am
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James Surowiecki: Why Do So Many Jobs Pay So Little?:

five of the six fastest-growing job categories today pay less than the median wage

CIVETS

Friday, August 30th, 2013 at 10:01 am
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CIVETS:

In the cycles of investment-marketing hype, BRICs have been replaced by the CIVETS (Colombia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Egypt, Turkey, and South Africa).

Photo

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013 at 6:28 pm
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“The success of “South Park” is a stark lesson in the fundamentals of entertainment: if you tell…”

Monday, January 28th, 2013 at 9:29 am
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“The success of “South Park” is a stark lesson in the fundamentals of entertainment: if you tell stories that people want to hear, the audience will find you. This is true no matter how fundamentally the paradigms shift, or how many platforms evolve. “We’ve been doing it long enough to figure out that content will ride on top of whatever wave comes along,” Mr. Stone said.”

Fortifying the Empire ‘South Park’ Built — www.nytimes.com — Readability

“most actively managed investments fail to beat the market over the long run”

Thursday, January 24th, 2013 at 7:36 am
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“most actively managed investments fail to beat the market over the long run”

Why Jack Bogle Is Right and Wrong

NYC GOV: Mayor Bloomberg’s Statement on the NRA’s Press Conference

Friday, December 21st, 2012 at 2:22 pm
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NYC GOV: Mayor Bloomberg’s Statement on the NRA’s Press Conference:

“The NRA’s Washington leadership has long been out of step with its members, and never has that been so apparent as this morning. Their press conference was a shameful evasion of the crisis facing our country. Instead of offering solutions to a problem they have helped create, they offered a…

“Money scripts, a term coined by financial psychologists Brad Klontz and Ted Klontz (Kahler and Fox…”

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012 at 8:34 am
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“Money scripts, a term coined by financial psychologists Brad Klontz and Ted Klontz (Kahler and Fox 2005), are core beliefs about money that drive financial behaviors. Money scripts are typically unconscious, developed in childhood, passed down from generation to generation within families and cultures, contextually bound, and often only partial truths (Klontz and Klontz 2009). When money scripts are developed in response to an emotionally charged, dramatic, or traumatic personal, family, or cultural financial flashpoint, such as significant losses during the Great Depression, parental abandonment, or financial bailouts by a family member”

How Clients’ Money Scripts Predict Their Financial Behaviors

“Young mobile readers don’t want apps and mobile browsers that look like the future. They want apps…”

Monday, December 17th, 2012 at 4:21 pm
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“Young mobile readers don’t want apps and mobile browsers that look like the future. They want apps that look like the past: 58% of those under 50, and 60% of Millennials, prefer a “print-like experience” over tech features like audio, video, and complex graphics. That preference toward plain text “tends to hold up across age, gender and other groups.” Pew reports: “Those under 40 prefer the print-like experience to the same degree as those 40 and over.””

How Do Millennials Like to Read the News? Very Much Like Their Grandparents – Derek Thompson – The Atlantic

“There are five questions to pose to someone you’re trying to be a mentor to: What is it that you…”

Sunday, December 9th, 2012 at 3:43 pm
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“There are five questions to pose to someone you’re trying to be a mentor to: What is it that you really want to be and do? What are you doing really well that is helping you get there? What are you not doing well that is preventing you from getting there? What will you do differently tomorrow to meet those challenges? How can I help, and where do you need the most help?”

A Good Mentor Never Tramples on Big Dreams

“While some advisors have the expertise, resources and time necessary to effectively manage hundreds…”

Sunday, December 2nd, 2012 at 12:38 pm
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“While some advisors have the expertise, resources and time necessary to effectively manage hundreds of client portfolios on a discretionary basis, most do not want to be portfolio managers. Instead, many advisors are transitioning toward fee-based financial planning, providing a variety of financial services rather than just portfolio management.”

Rise of the ETF Asset Managers

“Practice management solutions can be delivered in a number of ways. In the “Pursuing Practice…”

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012 at 5:59 am
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“Practice management solutions can be delivered in a number of ways. In the “Pursuing Practice Excellence” survey, we asked advisors to tell us which of 15 methods were most valuable to them. Nearly half of advisors said that one-on-one coaching was either valuable or very valuable. Conferences were the second highest ranked, followed by advisor CRM systems, on-site workshops and individual phone consultations.”

Pursuing Practice Excellence: The Advisor Perspective

“Asking clients instead whether they would buy that stock right now with the remainder of their…”

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012 at 8:30 am
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“Asking clients instead whether they would buy that stock right now with the remainder of their portfolio funds refocuses them on objective valuation. If they say no, then they’ve admitted that they don’t necessarily believe the stock is an attractive investment.”

This Is Your Client’s Brain on Finance

“The number of high net worth clients electing to go with a full service broker-dealer is up…”

Sunday, October 21st, 2012 at 2:17 pm
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“The number of high net worth clients electing to go with a full service broker-dealer is up year-over-year from 36% in 2010 and 2011. Among those who reported that a full service broker was their primary advisor, that number was even higher at 60%.”

spectrem-survey-says-wealthier-investors-prefer-wirehouses-over-rias-2681397-1.html

“Let’s use an example to illustrate why the dispersion of returns matters. Say you’re betting $1 on a…”

Friday, October 19th, 2012 at 10:21 pm
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“Let’s use an example to illustrate why the dispersion of returns matters. Say you’re betting $1 on a coin flip. How much would you have to get in return if you win to accept the bet? Would $1 back be enough? Would you need $2 to be willing to play? Now imagine that you’re betting $10,000 on a coin flip. How much would you have to earn in return to take that bet? Would it be more than the 2:1 payout of the $1 coin flip.”

Active funds too risky for most investors – CBS News

“What we sentimentalize in New York City is our lack of sentiment. We’re sweet on our own…”

Sunday, October 14th, 2012 at 11:22 am
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“What we sentimentalize in New York City is our lack of sentiment. We’re sweet on our own ruthlessness, and the proof is in what we tear down. Stores. Restaurants. Churches. Every landmark is negotiable, every bit of history for sale, every institution movable or removable for a price. Nothing here is forever. Not even Derek Jeter. … Eighteen seasons, 3,304 hits. Who knows how many starlets. Captain Intangibles in the City of the Damned. To reasonable people from anywhere else, New York is crazy, a bughouse — an asylum, a hive, a slice of 99-cent pizza falling on a pair of $1,600 shoes. It’s bike messengers and violinists, grime and Champagne. It’s a Babel, a bad dream, a siren, a grinding of the teeth. It’s that smell. It’s horse carts and nightclubs and town cars and bridges. It’s Trump and Jay-Z, The Times and the Post, three-card monte and the stock exchange. It’s a Korean bodega in a Greek neighborhood run by 4 guys from Yemen. It’s what America used to be before focus groups got hold of it. But New York makes sense to New Yorkers. Our cops and firefighters all look and sound like cops and firefighters, and the daily parade up and down the avenue of our actors and junkies and account executives is straight out of central casting. The ballplayers all look like ballplayers and first among them is Derek Jeter. As much a part of the mind’s skyline as the Flatiron or the Waldorf; as much a part of the tri-state subconscious as every car commercial they’ve ever bounced off your skull. Even if you hate baseball, he’s as permanent an impermanence as most New Yorkers can imagine. The only question is for how long?”

MacGregor: Is the Jeter Era ending? – ESPN

“Drip fits the gap of the superfan, the serious devotee. Maybe they’d only buy one to two records a…”

Wednesday, October 10th, 2012 at 11:31 am
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““Drip fits the gap of the superfan, the serious devotee. Maybe they’d only buy one to two records a year, but now they’re actually developing a relationship and getting a whole year of label releases,” he says. “Ultimately, the fans should feel like they’re connecting with the labels. The label’s personality should shine through, we’re purely just the place where it happens.””

Drip.fm Takes Music Discovery (Virtually) Back To The Record Store | Co.Create: Creativity \ Culture \ Commerce

“Their new building paradigm—officially labeled a “pilot program”—is a confluence of all…”

Monday, October 1st, 2012 at 12:34 pm
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“Their new building paradigm—officially labeled a “pilot program”—is a confluence of all these various impulses. The environment. Localism. Market growth. Low-cost, low-risk expandability.”

1 | An Experimental New Starbucks Store: Tiny, Portable, And Hyper Local | Co.Design: business innovation design

To Encourage Biking, Cities Lose the Helmets

Sunday, September 30th, 2012 at 3:52 pm
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To Encourage Biking, Cities Lose the Helmets:

the problem with pushing helmets isn’t practicality but that helmets

make a basically safe activity seem really dangerous

The Financial Services Club’s Blog — thefinanser.co.uk — Readability

Tuesday, September 11th, 2012 at 11:45 am
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The Financial Services Club’s Blog — thefinanser.co.uk — Readability:

“I used to work in hospitably – the restaurant and hotel business – and if

I ran my restaurant like a bank, you would turn up for lunch and we would

be closed. That’s because it was the staff lunchtime and they would be

eating. We would probably open around 3:00 instead, after our lunch had

finished.”

“The house was as perfectly quiet as if it were empty, yet he was aware of the girl standing…”

Sunday, July 8th, 2012 at 1:28 pm
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“The house was as perfectly quiet as if it were empty, yet he was aware of the girl standing somewhere upstairs, equally still, listening for him.”

Tessa Hadley: “An Abduction” : The New Yorker

“I find that the proliferation of Duane Reade and CVS and Rite-Aid makes the city much uglier, but I…”

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012 at 4:35 pm
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“I find that the proliferation of Duane Reade and CVS and Rite-Aid makes the city much uglier, but I do use these places and am sometimes even grateful that some are open twenty-four hours, as H & H used to be. Bank branches have no such redeeming qualities. They are the new urban blight.”

What Does the Proliferation of Bank Branches Mean for Manhattan? : The New Yorker